caltradesecrets.com

Archive for the ‘Motion to Dismiss’ Category

Southern District Holds That Misappropriation of Trade Secrets Claim Properly Pled Even Where Complaint Lacks Allegation of Use to Plaintiff’s Detriment

In Motion to Dismiss on November 17, 2010 at 7:47 am
Voigtländer camera, Vitoret F, Lanthar 2.8/50,...
Image via Wikipedia

The Southern District of California denied a motion to dismiss a claim for misappropriation of trade secrets even where counter-claimant does not allege plaintiff’s use of the trade secret to counter-claimant’s detriment.  Young v. Fluorotronics, Inc., No. 10cv976-WQH-BGS, 2010 WL 4569996 (S.D. Cal. Nov. 3, 2010) (slip op.).

Background

Plaintiff John Young, M.D. filed a complaint against Fluorotronics, Inc. and others relating to his investment in Fluoro-Raman technology, which was purported to be a portable, non-destructive and rapid screening device able to detect problems with food and drugs before they are distributed and detect counterfeit drugs.  Id. *1.  Plainitff alleged that the Private Placement Memorandum and Balance Sheet falsely stated that Fluorotronics was the owner of the “iStar ICCD Intensified CCD Detector Head camera” (“Camera”) and “certain Laser Equipment” (“Laser”). Id. Young for himself and others invested in Fluorotronics, but contrary to the representations of defendants, Fluorotronics allegedly did not own the Camera, but borrowed it from Andor Technology.  Id. **1-2.  When Fluorotronics failed to pay Andor for the camera, Young purchased it from Andor. Id. *2.  Plaintiff brought claims for (1) fraud; (2) negligent misrepresentation; (3) intentional misrepresentation; (4) securities fraud in violation of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, Section 10(b) and Rule 10b-5; (5) sale of unregistered securities; (6) breach of fiduciary duty; (7) violation of Section 1507(a) of the California General Corporation Law; and (8) violation of Section 2201 of the California General Corporation Law. Read the rest of this entry »

Northern District Denies Preliminary Injunction Where Plaintiff’s Declaration Failed to Show Customer List Was the Result of Substantial Time, Expense and Effort on Part of Plaintiff

In Customer lists, Motion to Dismiss, Preemption, Preliminary Injunction on September 24, 2010 at 11:02 am
Cinderella's Step-Mother and Her Two Lovely Da...
Image by myoldpostcards via Flickr

The Northern District of California denied defendants’ motion to dismiss based on UTSA preemption and denied plaintiff’s motion for preliminary injunction.  Kovesdy v. Kovesdy, C 10-02012 SBA, 2010 WL 3619826 (N.D. Cal. Sept. 13, 2010) (slip op.). Plaintiff Eric Kovesdy (“Eric” or “Plaintiff”) sued his stepmother, Defendant Hedy Kovesdy (“Hedy”) for, inter alia, for misappropriation of trade secrets under California’s Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“UTSA”), Cal. Civ. Code §§ 3426-3426.11, and trademark infringement under the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1125(a). Id. (1) Defendants moved to dismiss; and (2) Plaintiff moved for preliminary injunction.

Background

Peter Kovesdy (“Peter”) opened a professional tax practice known as Humex Income Tax (“Humex”).   Read the rest of this entry »

Northern District Rejects Motion to Dismiss Misappropriation of Trade Secrets Claim

In Motion to Dismiss on September 15, 2010 at 8:00 pm
Takshashila Academic Complex in IIT Kharagpur
Image via Wikipedia

In Farhang v. Indian Institute Of Technology, Kharagpur, No. C-08-02658 RMW, WL 3504897 (N.D. Cal. Sept. 7, 2010), Defendant Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (“IIT”) moved to dismiss a complaint for misappropriation of trade secrets on the grounds that it failed to allege sufficient facts showing that: (1) the alleged trade secrets were subject to reasonable efforts to maintain their secrecy; (2) IIT misappropriated trade secrets; and (3) plaintiffs suffered harm as a result.  Id. *1.  The court denied the motion. Read the rest of this entry »

Northern District Dismisses UTSA Cause of Action for Source Code Partially Filed With Copyright Office

In Copyright, Motion to Dismiss on September 9, 2010 at 8:29 am
The source code for Ctrl-Alt-Del
Image by ptufts via Flickr

The Northern District dismissed a California Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA or CUTSA) cause of action in a software code distribution case for failure to adequately allege secrecy. Kema, Inc. v. Koperwhats, No. C-09-1587 MMC, 2010 WL 3464708 (N.D. Cal. Sept. 1, 2010) (slip op.). Read the rest of this entry »

Northern District Holds No Cause of Action Exists for Misappropriation of “Ideas”

In Motion to Dismiss, Preliminary Injunction on August 28, 2010 at 6:30 am
Luminous Idea
Image by Tiago Daniel via Flickr

The Northern District held that no cause of action exists for “misappropriation of business ideas”.  Interserve, Inc. v. Fusion Garage PTE. Ltd., No. C 09-5812 RS (PVT), 2010 WL 3339520 (N.D. Cal. Aug. 24, 2010) (slip op.).

Plaintiff Interserve, Inc. and Fusion Garage collaborated in an attempt to bring to market a tablet computer, which they intended to call the “CrunchPad.”  Id. *1.  Shortly before the parties had planned to announce that the product would soon be released, defendant Fusion Garage advised plaintiffs that it would proceed on its own, and market a tablet computer under the name “joojoo” instead. Id. Plaintiffs brought suit, alleging that they are co-owners of the joojoo.  Id. They sought a preliminary injunction requiring defendant to sequester all proceeds it obtains from selling the product. Id. Defendant opposed the motion for preliminary injunction, and moved to dismiss the complaint, including a claim for misappropriation of “business ideas”. Id. Read the rest of this entry »

In Software Distribution Case, Northern District Holds That Improper Disclosure Element of UTSA Claim Properly Pled Where Acknowledgment of EULA Alleged

In Motion to Dismiss on August 27, 2010 at 5:29 pm
Intellectual piracy - "Shrek III" mo...
Image via Wikipedia

In BMMSoft, Inc. v. White Oaks Technology, Inc., No. C-09-4562 MMC, 2010 WL 3340555 (N.D. Cal. Aug. 25, 2010), the court denied a motion to dismiss a misappropriation of trade secrets claim in an unauthorized software distribution case.  The court held that the improper disclosure element was properly pled where the complaint included an allegation that defendant clicked “I agree” to an end user license agreement restricting unauthorized disclosure. Read the rest of this entry »